Ready for Liftoff

For the speed issue we take a look at forward-thinking disruptors and innovators from the startup capitals of the world. These are the people behind the big ideas that are changing the future, coming up with new ways to look at old problems, and in the process inspiring us by their entrepreneurial spirit and their ambition to execute change.

Interview JUSTIN ROSS
Photography BERT SPANGEMACHER

ADRIAN BIANCO, BIANCISSIMO
Global Youth Culture | A Tokyo Transplant Uncovering Subcultures

Eyewear by BLACKFIN ESBJERG
Eyewear by BLACKFIN ESBJERG

 

Project: Biancissimo & Ruby Pseudo – Worldwide
Position: I do too many things
Age: 32
Location: Global
Founded: 2016
Website: www.biancissimo.com

“Being real and honest will not help you making profit and gain friends in the industry, but people will start respecting and trusting you.”

What is your mission?
I started this project to shine light on subcultures, creative minds, driving forces and young voices that don’t necessarily have to be famous or known. It is also to guide people to the best and most authentic food and make them buy plane tickets to Japan.

What makes your project (or you) different?
It’s not about me.

What have you learned from starting this project?
Being real and honest will not help you making profit and gain friends in the industry, but people will start respecting and trusting you.

What were the most difficult challenges along the way?
To keep my content authentic, mostly unpaid and to do this all next to earning money with all my other jobs. I basically say no to a lot of advertorials and paid content because I work a lot all the time on other jobs and projects. It’s not easy, my energy is limited and I barely have a single day without work. That’s the life I choose.

What did you do before your current role?
I worked for Virtue/Vice as a creative, also as an editor-in-chief. I did a lot for Adidas Originals and a little bit for Nike. I did the whole “creative person in Berlin” thing. Stuff that sounds nice when you tell them someone at a bar, but it’s just work at the end of the day. Lovely and necessary.

Where do you look for inspiration as an entrepreneur?
I look at strong women. They are my inspiration. I only grew up with women and for me a woman is everything. She’s the boss, whoever she is. I also like to look up to Manga/Anime heroes. They never forget to laugh about themselves, they never take themselves too seriously and they are super strong still. I like that.

What does it mean to be a startup?
Work a lot, invest a lot of time, be free, be afraid of taxes, be able to sleep as long as you want and still wake up at 7am.

Is it important to be first or fastest?
Be real. That’s the most important thing.

What advice do you have for people with a great idea who want to start their own business?
Just do it. It took me so long to finally start and I could have done it way earlier. I was too afraid, but you will always be afraid of doing your own thing. So don’t wait.

In ten years where do you want to be?
In my office in Tokyo.