Artist Profile 14 – Emily Thomas 

Informed by our urban environment, sculptor Emily Thomas is a young emerging artist reimagining our sense of place.

Photography BERT SPANGEMACHER
Interview JUSTIN ROSS

Our pick for the Artist Profile this time is Emily Thomas who recently graduated from the prestigious Chelsea College of Arts in London and in just over a year since then has been touring the world, incorporating influences from many different cultures into her colorful, geometric sculptures. Her research-based practice takes architecture, history, and our urban environment as a starting point—basically the built objects that make up our sense of place—and through a process of abstraction and metamorphosis, turns these ideas into new gestures, colors, and geometries, that still retain a signature sense of space and place.

Having recently completed artistic residencies at both GlogauAIR in Kreuzberg, Berlin and Soulangh Cultural Park in Tainan, Taiwan, Emily Thomas will set off to Barcelona in early 2020, winning an award for a residency at La Escocesa from La Memoria Artistica Chema Alvargonzalez.

In 4SEE Artist Profile, we were able to meet up with Emily Thomas to see where she previously worked and was inspired during her residency at GlogauAIR, Berlin.

Interview from October 2019

4SEE Artist Profile, Emily Thomas, photographed by Bert Spangemacher
4SEE Artist Profile – Emily Thomas
Photography by Bert Spangemacher

Name Emily Thomas
Age 23
Nationality British
Medium Multidisciplinary (Sculpture, Painting, Photography, Collage, Installation)
Based in Somerset, UK
Recent/upcoming exhibition (projects)
Shapeshifter (9 July – 31 August) Soulangh Cultural Park, Taiwan
Birthday Exhibition (27 June – 3 August) La peau de l’ours, Brussels
London is Open (31 August) Global 12 Festival, London
Find more at www.ethomasart.com / instagram / Facebook

Did you always know that you were going to be an artist?

Not exactly, although I was exposed to creativity from a young age. After I was born, my mum became a child minder so she could spend more time at home. She is a very creative lady herself, and although she was never exposed to the ‘artworld’ as such, she spent most of her professional career as a primary school teacher where her natural artistic talents came out in art lessons and displays at school. We spent a lot of time painting and drawing together and with other children at home. We covered the kitchen walls with the artwork that we made. This included drawings, paintings and prints done with vegetables and polystyrene shapes!

I was always fascinated with colour, and building things out of wooden blocks and lego. There are actually a few visual similarities to be seen in things I made as a child and my sculptures now! My parents built and designed a lot of their house themselves. I grew up with this, and I think it definitely inspired a certain way of thinking. It showed me how to be resourceful and to solve problems through building and inventing. Although I wasn’t exposed to any art exhibitions from a young age, I was immersed by a different kind of creative practice through my parents. I think this was a genuine way to develop creative skills and interests, and this is something that I really value.

Both my parents are also classical musicians, and my father works mainly as an instrumental brass teacher. When I was nine years old, he set up a sort of music exchange with a close friend of his who was a woodwind player. The deal was that my dad taught his friend’s son the trumpet, and my dad’s friend taught me the clarinet. I began learning classical music very seriously, and was awarded a bursary to study the clarinet at a specialist music school at the age of fourteen.

At this point, I thought I would probably become a musician. However, the school I attended was very high pressured and rigorously structured, and it sadly sucked the fun out of music for me.
Meanwhile, I adored my art lessons and visited my first art exhibition with school in 2012: David Hockney’s A Bigger Picture at the Royal Academy of Arts London. This was an amazing experience for me as I had only ever been in a city a handful of times, and never before had I stepped into an art gallery. Hockney’s exhibition definitely nurtured my love of colour and inspired me to take this further in my practice.

At the age of seventeen, I found myself skiving lessons and skipping music practice to go and paint. It was at this point that I knew I wanted to be an artist. I switched my focus from preparing for music college auditions to building my portfolio for art school.

Do you find the art world (creative world) cutthroat and competitive, or is it also supportive and community-minded, or something in between?

I think you have to be willing to sacrifice a lot of common comforts and everyday social norms to be an emerging artist, but this allows you to be more genuine and less materialistic as you naturally discover what is important to you and in life. For me, it is the people that I surround myself with that make my own ‘art bubble’ so wonderful. Meeting and working with like-minded artists and practitioners with similar questions and curiosities removes the competitive side of the artworld from my immediate experience and everyday life. In this sense, the artworld can be what you make of it. I love that feeling of who/what/when/where/why in relation to my future, it’s exciting.

Artwork by Emily Thomas // Construction in collaboration with 林林書杰 Lin Shu-Jie // Photography by Rich Matheson // Exhibition supported by the Cultural Affairs Bureau, Tainan City Government // They Nailed the Colours to the Mast (2019) // Solo Exhibition Shapeshifters at Soulangh Cultural Park, Taiwan // Plywood, oil paint // 202 x 135 x 135cm
Artwork by Emily Thomas //
Construction in collaboration with 林林書杰 Lin Shu-Jie //
Photography by Rich Matheson //
Exhibition supported by the Cultural Affairs Bureau, Tainan City Government //
They Nailed the Colours to the Mast (2019) //
Solo Exhibition Shapeshifters at Soulangh Cultural Park, Taiwan //
Plywood, oil paint //
202 x 135 x 135cm
Artwork and Photography by Emily Thomas
Artwork and Photography by Emily Thomas //
Exhibition coordinated by 林林書杰 Lin Shu-Jie //
Exhibition supported by the Cultural Affairs Bureau, Tainan City Government //
Shapeshifters (2019) //
Solo Exhibition: Soulangh Cultural Park, Taiwan

What would you consider to be your biggest accomplishment so far?

Earlier this year I participated in a three month artist residency program at Soulangh Cultural Park, Taiwan. With support from the Cultural Affairs Bureau of the Tainan City Government, I was able to produce an outdoor solo exhibition for the first time. One of the most insightful moments of this experience was when young families gathered to watch me working with wood and power tools outside of my studio. It struck me that you don’t often see women working in construction, particularly outside of Europe, and I felt both honoured and empowered to be setting this example.

I also made valuable friendships with my neighbours. I visited many places with them whereby I felt fully immersed within Taiwanese culture. I met many local people and had enriching
conversations about their life experiences, as well as their knowledge and experiences of different architecture in Taiwan. I also had the opportunity to collaborate with 林 書 杰 Lin Shu-Jie, a very talented technician and maker who taught me many new and valuable skills.

Categorised somewhere between architecture, object, painting and sculpture, my final series of work presented a timeline of architectural history within Taiwan. I combined the variety of architectural styles I discovered there in order to demonstrate the cultural fusion within the country and it’s rich political history. The exhibition aimed to uncover how architecture has previously served and will continue to serve as a literal and metaphorical ‘Shapeshifter’ of place identity through time.

Whilst I consider this residency and exhibition to be my biggest professional accomplishment so far, it was also one of the most enjoyable and rewarding experiences I have ever had.

Does art always need to be relevant? Is there a place for aesthetic indulgence, or do politics come into play in your motivation?

I think that art can be anything. It is more the definition of ‘good’ and ‘bad’ art that is a constant point of controversy, as it is of course subjective. Even if you tried to make art that is irrelevant to our society, it would automatically become relevant through it’s opposition. So in response to this question, no I do not think that art needs to be relevant, although it is very difficult to achieve complete detachment from everything through art, as it is such a personal form of expression.

I am personally more interested in artwork that is conceptually intriguing and tells a story through its aesthetics, however I do think that there is also a place for pure aesthetic indulgence.

Growing up in a small village with a population of just 300 people, I became fascinated by the city when I moved to London in 2014. During my studies at the University of the Arts London I gained an interest in the current housing crisis and gentrification. This triggered many questions which I am still exploring in my work now.

My work is inspired by architecture as an indicator of historical, social and cultural characteristics of a place. I identify these aspects by analysing the thematic, repetitive features of buildings, as well as their structural forms and materiality. The process of walking as research in order to take photographs of buildings and discover new places is the underlying foundation of my work’s creation. I carefully select photographs to communicate my ideas, taking both conceptual and aesthetic concerns into consideration. Collage informs and aids these decisions, as I am able to visualise the possible outcomes of my photographs as three-dimensional abstract forms.

4SEE Artist Profile, Emily Thomas, photographed by Bert Spangemacher
4SEE Artist Profile – Emily Thomas
Photography by Bert Spangemacher

What topics have got you inspired at the moment?

In January 2019 I began a three month artist residency at GlogauAIR, Berlin. It was here that I discovered the present housing tensions within the city. Walking as research around the local districts of Kreuzberg, Neukölln and Friedrichshain drew my attention to societal differences, indicated by contrasting building facades and gentrification. This led to my further studies of social housing and the history of Berlin’s urban infrastructure, whereby I discovered Bruno Taut’s Hufeisensiedlung, Neukölln (1925-1930). My final exhibition at GlogauAIR demonstrated my preliminary research of this housing estate.
I am currently developing my studies of the Hufeisensiedlung and five other Berlin Modernism housing estates built between 1919 and 1934. These include Gartenstadt Falkenberg (Treptow), Schillerpark-Siedlung (Wedding), Wohnstadt Carl Legien (Prenzlauer Berg), Weiße Stadt (Reinickendorf) and Großsiedlung Siemensstadt (Charlottenburg and Spandau). The aims of these building projects, including the Hufeisensiedlung, were to solve Berlin’s housing shortage after the industrial revolution. In 2008 they were listed as UNESCO World Heritage Sites. I would like to investigate what made these architectural projects so successful and whether similar ideologies and infrastructures could be used to improve contemporary urban development and society now that Berlin is once again a growing city. This idea was originally inspired by the designer and writer Ben Buschfeld.

Artwork and Photography by Emily Thomas // Project supported by European Cultural Foundation and Compagnia di San Paolo // Hufeisen (2019) // Glogauair Open Studios, Berlin // Emulsion paint on MDF // 200 x 400 x 70cm
Artwork and Photography by Emily Thomas //
Project supported by European Cultural Foundation and Compagnia di San Paolo //
Hufeisen (2019) //
Glogauair Open Studios, Berlin //
Emulsion paint on MDF //
200 x 400 x 70cm
Artwork and Photography by Emily Thomas
Artwork by Emily Thomas //
Photography by Juliette Szhw //
Project supported by European Cultural Foundation and Compagnia di San Paolo //
Hufeisen (2019) //
Glogauair Open Studios, Berlin //
Emulsion paint on MDF //
200 x 400 x 70cm

What is it like to be currently living and working between Somerset (UK) and Berlin?

I have spent most of this year living at artist residencies in different countries, where I have been developing my own projects. I am currently moving between the Somerset countryside (UK) and Berlin and hope that I will eventually be based in Berlin on a more permanent basis. Somerset is very quiet and I am mostly surrounded by fields. There is a really cosy local pub and small quirky characteristics such as a library telephone box and a friendly community shop. I enjoy seeing my family everyday and walking the dogs, and I am able to focus on my work without many distractions. I usually spend my time in Somerset catching up on admin, writing applications and collecting my thoughts. I lived in the countryside for 18 years growing up and it became a normalised way of life. I believe that I will come back to it in my practice and research for sure, it just doesn’t excite me to the same extent as the city right now.

Berlin is very different to Somerset and I enjoy this contrast. I am still discovering the city and it is always full of surprises.

What is next for you, an immediately upcoming project or chance to see your work?

I am very happy to announce that I will be heading to Barcelona for three months in January to begin an exciting new project and develop new research at La Escocesa. The exhibition dates for this project will be released on my website when they have been confirmed.

Where do you see yourself in ten years‘ time, where would you like to see your (art)work and at what scale?

Part of my love of being an artist is that I don’t know what is going to happen. I have many ideas and many dreams, but nothing is ever set in concrete. I am happy for my future career path to twist and turn – it keeps me on my toes. In that sense I don’t see myself anywhere in particular in ten years time. I have thought about the possibility of doing a masters degree, and I also like the idea of running my own artists residency program. One of my dreams from a very young age was to build my own house. I love the idea of creating a semi-transportable home just outside of the city. I sometimes get very excited about this and begin to imagine having on-site studios for artists, a co-working woodshop, a jazz club etc. Maybe I’m getting a bit carried away, but who knows what the future holds!

For me, it is not about where my artwork ends up or on what scale. I enjoy travelling and hope that I am able to visit as many countries as possible. Carrying out exhibitions abroad whilst being immersed within different cultures and collaborating with other artists and practitioners has been both inspiring and rewarding. I hope that I am able to continue doing this as much as possible in the future, and I am excited about the opportunities and collaborations that could emerge.

4SEE Artist Profile, Emily Thomas, photographed by Bert Spangemacher
4SEE Artist Profile – Emily Thomas
Photography by Bert Spangemacher
Eyewear by SALT.

The New Vanguard – Artist Profile 13
Filip Berte

Der frühere Architekt und nun Künstler Filip Berte untersucht die Konzepte von Grenzen und Zugehörigkeit in seinem vielschichtigen Oeuvre.

Fotograf BERT SPANGEMACHER
Interview JUSTIN ROSS

Filip Berte ist ein belgischer, interdisziplinär arbeitender Künstler mit Ausbildungen sowohl in der Kunst als auch der Architektur. Er nutzt seine Kunst, um zutiefst politische und extrem relevante Themen wie Migration, die europäische Frage, Grenzen und Zugehörigkeit zu erforschen. Sein jüngstes und noch laufendes Projekt „Un-Home/ Moving Stones” erkundet das Konzept von Übergangsräumen – Orte, die Migranten durchlaufen müssen und an denen sie durch externe Prozesse bewertet werden. Bei seinen Besuchen an solchen Orten, zum Beispiel Flüchtlingslager oder Migrationsbehörden, fängt Berte auf poetische Weise die Starre und die nicht sichtbaren Kräfte ein, die das Leben dieser Menschen prägen. Von jahrelanger Erosion geformt, sind die Steine und Höhlen, die in vielen seiner Installationen und Fotografien auftauchen, gleichzeitig Objekt und Subjekt. Manchmal betrachten wir diese Steine an einem bestimmten Ort; unbeweglich, passiv und inaktiv, dem Schicksal, das sie erwartet, ergeben. Ein anderes Mal sehen wir die Welt aus ihrer Perspektive. Sie vermittelt uns ein anderes Ortsgefühl. Sonderbar nah am Boden sowohl fotografisch als auch metaphorisch eingefroren.

Berte teilt mit 4SEE Einsichten in seine Karriere als Künstler, die von seinem Drang getrieben sind, die Fragen zu stellen, die in seinem Architekturstudium unbeantwortet blieben. Er beschreibt seine allmähliche Wandlung zum praktizierenden Künstler und seine Erfahrungen in Sarajevo, wo er mit der Realität einer vom Krieg geteilten Gesellschaft, deren Wiederaufbau in historische und politische Teilungen verstrickt war, konfrontiert wurde. Diese Erinnerungen und Erfahrungen nahm er mit nach Belgien zurück, wo er heute lebt und arbeitet.

Name Filip Berte
Alter 43
Nationalität belgisch
Techniken multidisziplinär (Zeichnung, Malerei, Installation, Fotografie, Film, Performance)
lebt und arbeitet in Ghent
aktuelle/kommende Ausstellungen und Projekte 28/07/2019 – Pre-Triennale Brügge (BE), 18.10.2019 „Endless Drawings / Disrupted Continuities”- Europalia Romania 2019, CC Strombeek (Brüssel) in Kooperation mit Salonul de Proiecte (Bukarest)
mehr unter www.filipberte.com / instagram

Interview im Juli 2019

4SEE Artist Profile - Filip Berte Photography by Bert Spangemacher Eyewear by Coblens
4SEE Artist Profile – Filip Berte, Eyewear by Coblens

War dir schon immer klar, dass du ein Künstler bist?

Irgendwie wusste ich schon immer, dass ich ein Künstler bin (oder sein würde), aber vielleicht eher in einem verdeckten Sinn, in der Form eines professionellen Architekten. Denn zuallererst habe ich leidenschaftlich (zum Teil auch vernünftig) entschlossen, Architektur zu studieren. Malen und Zeichnen wurden zu Plan B, in Form eines Teilzeitstudiums an der Kunstakademie in Gent.

Aber schon bald nach meinem Abschluss im Jahr 1999 und während der darauffolgenden zwei Jahre voller notwendiger Praktika in diversen Architekturbüros bekam ich Zweifel an meiner Entscheidung, als Architekt zu arbeiten. Mein Geist war von Bildern und Gedanken zum Balkan nach dem Krieg geplagt. Das kam von meinem Abschlussprojekt zur „Rekonstruktion der National- und Universitätsbibliothek von Bosnien und Herzegowina in Sarajevo”. Ich hatte das Gefühl, als Architekt versagt und nicht die „richtigen Antworten” für dieses Projekt gehabt zu haben. Dieses Gebäude hatte zu viele Facetten – eine verlassene Ruine, nachdem es vom serbischen Militär absichtlich in Brand gesetzt worden war -, die zu kompliziert oder zu sensibel war, um sie auf einer politischen oder geschichtlichen Ebene behandeln zu können. All diese Fragen, die ich mir selbst über die Jahre hinweg nicht beantworten konnte, lösten eine Art Identitätskrise in mir aus; wer bin ich, als westeuropäischer Architekt, der den Krieg nur im Fernsehen gesehen hat, dass ich jetzt die Antworten gebe, wie man so ein politisch und historisch vielschichtiges Gebäude rekonstruieren soll? Wer bin ich, dass ich die richtige Form und Funktion bei dem Wiederaufbau dieses Symbols für multikulturelles Leben vor dem Krieg finden könnte?

Meine Reise nach Sarajevo zu der Zeit, nicht einmal fünf Jahre nach Kriegsende, holte mich in die Realität zurück und brachte die Architekturfragen wieder auf das Wesentliche zurück. Die Stadt war nicht nur physisch ruiniert, sondern auch psychologisch und sozial. Das war eine Begegnung mit einer post-traumatischen Gesellschaft. Es war eine Kollision!

Drei Monate vor dem Ende meines Praktikums beschloss ich zu pausieren und nach Belgrad zu ziehen. Davor hatte ich bereits Sarajevo besucht. Belgrad und den Kosovo jedoch zunächst nur bei Kurzbesuchen. Nun sollte mir mein Leben in Belgrad die fehlenden Antworten auf meine Fragen liefern. Fragen danach, wie man als Architekt mit der Zukunft umgeht, mit gesellschaftlichen Fragen und größeren Problemen des nach dem Krieg aufkommenden Nationalismus, der Dämonisierung oder Schikane ganzer Nationalitäten, ethnischer, kultureller oder religiöser Minderheiten, mit Geflüchteten, Grenzen, Europa, und so weiter … Diese Probleme waren während meiner Zeit in Belgrad sehr spürbar und ich begann damit, an einigen Bildern zu arbeiten, die auf der Titelseite der wichtigsten serbischen Zeitung, „Politika”, basierten.

Zum ersten Mal gab Kunst (in der Form von Malerei) mir das bestärkende Gefühl, Nachrichten, oder besser gesagt Fragen, die tief unter der Oberfläche brodelten, an ein größeres Publikum zu vermitteln. Heute sehe ich diese Bilder – die ich tatsächlich niemals jemandem gezeigt habe – als einen bescheidenen, jedoch authentischen Ausdruck meiner langsamen Wandlung vom Architekten zum Künstler an.

Meine Entscheidung, nach einem Jahr in Belgrad wieder nach Belgien zurückzukehren, war gleichzeitig eine Entscheidung, in Zukunft nicht mehr ausschließlich als Architekt zu arbeiten. Ich entschied mich deshalb bewusst dazu, die letzten drei Monate des Praktikums, die für den vollen Abschluss als Architekt notwendig waren, nicht zu beenden. Allerdings bin ich immer noch sehr zufrieden mit meinen Entscheidungen aus dieser Zeit und bin überzeugt, dass ich durch meine Kunstprojekte das Medium Architektur noch tiefgehender (oder essentieller) vorantreibe, als damals, als ich noch Architektur auf die verbreitete, reguläre Weise verfolgt habe.

4SEE Artist Profile - Filip Berte Photography by Bert Spangemacher Eyewear by Coblens
4SEE Artist Profile – Filip Berte, Eyewear by Coblens

Empfindest du die Kunstwelt eher als rücksichtslos und umkämpft oder als gemeinschaftlich und voller Unterstützung? Oder gibt es für dich Abstufungen zwischen diesen beiden Extremen?

Generell denke ich, dass es immer diese Klischeeversion einer Kunstwelt-Blase geben wird, einfach, weil das System sich immer wieder selbst kopiert und regeneriert. Weil es sich selbst so liebt. Süchtiger Narzissmus.

Die Frage ist mehr: Möchte ich Teil des Systems sein oder daran teilhaben, darin als eine bloße Erweiterung der wettbewerbsorientierten neoliberalen Wirtschaft fungieren? Teile ich die Werte der Menschen, die in diesem System operieren? Zu all diesen Fragen würde ich nein sagen.

Ich persönlich glaube an und kenne glücklicherweise auch andere Wege, mit anderen KünstlerInnen und Kunstschaffenden zusammenzuarbeiten. Das ist mehr wie ein lebendiger Organismus gedacht, eine Gemeinschaft von Kunstschaffenden, die Werte teilen, für ehrliche Bezahlung in der breiten Palette von „Jobs”, die wir ausüben, kämpfen, Wissen und Ressourcen teilen … Gleichzeitig versuchen wir, eine alternative Denk- und Handlungsweise für unseren Alltag als KünstlerInnen zu bieten, als eine Reaktion auf die vorherrschende Wettbewerbslogik der Kunstwelt.

Eutopia / Tbilisi / Hotel Abkhazeti / Façade © Filip Berte (2012)
Eutopia / Tbilisi / Hotel Abkhazeti / Façade © Filip Berte (2012)

Was ist deiner Meinung nach dein bisher größter Erfolg?

Als Beispiel könnte ich „House of Eutopia” nennen, mein erstes persönliches Langzeit-Kunstprojekt (sieben Jahre), bei dem Europa als mein Bauland und meine Baustelle diente. Mit „Haus of Eutopia” habe ich meine künstlerische Praxis in Form von einem langsam anwachsenden Prozess von „Bebauungsfragen” weiterentwickelt und sie für ein Publikum sichtbar gemacht. Dieses Projekt hat die Form einer großen Installation angenommen, die bewegt werden und temporär an verschiedenen Orten in ganz Europa aufgebaut werden konnte. Für mich war die Beweglichkeit ein sehr wichtiger Aspekt, denn so konnte ich meine Fragen zu sozialen, historischen, politischen Problemen an interessante Orte bringen und ein größeres Publikum erreichen. Gleichzeitig konnte ich damit den Grenzen von nur einem festgesetzten Ort, an dem ein Gebäude und seine Baustelle fixiert sein müssen, und damit auch nur einem Kontext entfliehen.

Eutopia / Batumi Transitus / Hyper-Façade © Filip Berte (2014)
Eutopia / Batumi Transitus / Hyper-Façade © Filip Berte (2014)

Muss Kunst immer bedeutungsvoll sein? Gibt es Raum für ästhetische Spielereien oder denkst du das Politische immer mit?

Aus meiner Perspektive muss ich sagen, dass ich es – und ich spreche für die Werke, die ich mache – wichtig finde, dass Kunst bedeutungsvoll ist. Ich finde es schwer, nicht auf den politischen oder sozialen Kontext um mich herum zu reagieren. Wie schon gesagt begann ich mein Künstlerleben offiziell deshalb, weil ich einfach einen anderen Weg, eine andere Sprache als Architektur finden musste, um unsere Lebensart und unsere räumliche und politische Organisation, unsere Leben und Gesellschaften zu hinterfragen. Durch meine künstlerische Arbeit kann ich Themen bearbeiten und ausdrücken, die aktuell in Gesellschaften kritisch und problematisch sind (das verändert sich immer). Seitdem hat meine Arbeit, die ich über die Jahre hinweg weiterentwickelt habe, einen stetig wachsenden, aktiven Reflex. Das ist meine größte Motivation als Künstler, dass ich – durch Kunst – Themen auf sehr persönliche Weise hinterfragen und ansprechen kann, aber mit dem Anspruch, dass ich die monolithische Haltung von Menschen zu anderen Menschen und zu polarisierenden Gedanken, Aussagen oder Problemem öffnen oder sogar verändern kann. Nicht, dass ich eine dogmatische, klare Nachricht in meiner Arbeit verstecken würde. Im Gegenteil, meine Werke bieten nichts mehr als eine Frage. Ich sehe das als kleine Geste, um sich zu öffnen und Raum zum Atmen anzubieten, der in einer harten und erdrückenden (politischen) Zeit so sehr gebraucht wird. Ich mache keine politische Kunst, sondern Kunst mit einem politischen Reflex; Kunst, die Menschlichkeit in einem breiteren und universellen Sinne durch Themen wie Inklusion und Exklusion, Realität an Grenzen und Marginalität widerspiegelt.

Natürlich gibt es absolut einen Platz für ästhetische Genüsslichkeit, aber nicht nur um der Ästhetik willen. Aber die Ästhetik eines Werks ist die erste Verbindung zu diesem Werk für jeden außenstehenden Betrachter. Die Ästhetik ist deshalb der Schlüssel, um jemanden dazu zu bringen, sich die Zeit zu nehmen und den tieferen, zugrundeliegenden Inhalt zu enthüllen. Anders gesagt ist die Ästhetik die erste oberflächliche Schicht, die heruntergekratzt werden kann, um die tieferen Schichten zu enthüllen und zu entdecken, was die Arbeit so komplex und vielschichtig macht wie nötig.

Un-Home / Moving Stones - Untitled © Filip Berte (2019)
Un-Home / Moving Stones – Untitled © Filip Berte (2019)

Wenn nicht Politik, was sind dann wichtige Inspirationsquellen für dich? Welche Themen inspirieren dich im Moment?

Neben den sozio-politischen Realitäten, die auf irgendeine Weise immer in meinem Werk mitschwingen, inspirieren mich auch Natur, Geologie und Philosophie sehr. Zum Beispiel nimmt der (philosophische) Archetyp der Höhle einen wichtigen metaphorischen Platz in dem Narrativ meines laufenden Projekts „Un-Home / Moving Stones” ein, das sich auf das Thema des Bauens mentaler Bilder von Asylsuchenden, Geflüchteten, Neuankömmlingen und Migranten fokussiert.

Die Höhle ist für mich ein Referenzort, der Liminalität reflektiert und in der sozio-politischen Position von Asylsuchenden und Geflüchteten in unserer Gesellschaft nachhallt. Sie sind in der Schwebe, zwischen zwei Realitäten, in den sozio-politischen Rissen, Höhlen und Löchern, ausgeschlossen von oder versteckt vor den Augen der Anderen in der Gesellschaft. Die Höhle, als Negativ-Raum in den Bergen oder aus dem Inneren der Erdkruste gehauen, ist ein natürlicher Unterschlupf, sie bietet Schutz. Die Höhle ist ein Raum, der durch geologische Prozesse von Auflösung und Zerfall über Tausende bis Millionen von Jahren entstanden ist.

Mich faszinieren diese enormen, zeitverschlingenden und gegensätzlichen geologischen Prozesse der Integration und Desintegration, Formation und Destruktion. Darin liegt, genau wie in der Natur generell, eine enorme Kraft, die uns konfrontiert und uns das (Zeit-)Ausmaß und die Position unserer Leben in dieser Welt besser verstehen lässt.

Woran arbeitest du und wo kann man deine Arbeiten das nächste Mal sehen?

Im August reise ich für drei Wochen durch Rumänien, um an einem sehr spannenden Projekt mit Fokus auf das Land im Kontext der internationalen Kunst-Biennale Europalia zu arbeiten. Ich wurde von dem Brüsseler Kunstzentrum CC Strombeek dazu eingeladen, neue Werke zu entwickeln, die sich mit den Themen „Dislokation und Zugehörigkeit” beschäftigen. Diese neuen Arbeiten werden in einer Gruppenausstellung mit den Werken anderer belgischer und rumänischer KünstlerInnnen bei CC Strombeek zu sehen sein.

Ich arbeite noch an den Werken; es ist ein verlockendes und komplexes Unterfangen. Der Titel meiner neuen Arbeit wird „Endless Drawings / Disrupted Continuities” sein, womit ich fünf „Biographien der Dislokation” zum Leben erwecken will. Damit meine ich, die Parallelen zwischen den Leben von zum Beispiel rumänischen Menschen, die Teil der weit verbreiteten rumänischen Diaspora sind, wirtschaftlichen Neuankömmlingen (aus China, Sri-Lanka, Vietnam, Nepal) und Asylsuchenden und Geflüchteten, die in Rumänien leben, aufzuspüren und nachzuzeichnen.

Schlussendlich würde ich gerne Stück für Stück ein räumliches Bild aufbauen, das aus fünf „Zeichnungssäulen” besteht, die in einer langsamen, kontinuerlichen vertikalen Pendelbewegung aus Falten und Entfalten gefangen sind. Jede dieser „Zeichnungssäulen” wird aus einer Sammlung von Zeichnungen gebildet, die ich während meiner Reise durch Rumänien herstellen werde. Jede davon wird spontan vor Ort gezeichnet, während ich die privaten (temporären) Wohnorte der Menschen besuche. Der Akt des Zeichnens ist ein direkter, jedoch sehr ehrlicher und menschlicher Zugang zu Personen und wird mir dabei helfen, einen natürlichen Dialog zu beginnen, in dem ich empfindlichere Themen in Zusammenhang mit dem zerrissenen Leben, das alle teilen, ansprechen kann.

4SEE Artist Profile - Filip Berte Photography by Bert Spangemacher Eyewear by Coblens
4SEE Artist Profile – Filip Berte, Eyewear by Coblens

Wo siehst du dich und deine Kunst in zehn Jahren?

Irgendwie ist das eine komische Frage für mich, weil ich nicht gerne darüber nachdenke, wo ich mich in zehn Jahren sehe. Darüber will ich nicht zu viel nachdenken. In Bezug auf die Dimension meiner Arbeiten bin ich versucht zu sagen, dass meine Arbeiten gerne immer weniger als physisches „Kunstwerk” sichtbar sein können, aber dafür mehr und mehr als etwas Vergängliches, das sich in die Gesellschaft selbst auflöst.

Vielleicht wäre das auch ein Zeichen dafür, dass die Gesellschaft wirklich offen und inklusiv geworden ist…

The New Vanguard – Artist Profile 12
Joanna Szproch 

Interview JUSTIN ROSS
Fotografin JOANNA SZPROCH

Joanna Szproch ist eine polnische Fotokünstlerin mit einem Gespür für den Ausdruck von Farben. In ihrer Arbeit setzt sie sich mit Weiblichkeit auseinander und versucht, eine Balance zwischen den Polen Unschuld und Vulgarität herzustellen. Auf der Jagd nach diesem magischen Moment lässt sich Szproch von der Individualität ihrer Modelle leiten, indem sie voller Mitgefühl deren Drang, ihre Sinnlichkeit auszudrücken, folgt. Diese ungehemmte Atmosphäre innerhalb derer Raum für Selbsterforschung ist, ist die zentrale Komponente ihrer Arbeit und regt die Betrachterin dazu an, es ihr nachzutun.

Name Joanna Szproch
Altert 40
Nationalität Polish
Medium Photography
lebt und arbeitet in Berlin
aktuelle Ausstellung @smilefomedaddy
mehr unter www.joannaszproch.com / @johana_pl

4SEE Artist Profile 12 Joanna Szproch in Coblens
4SEE Artist Profile 12 Joanna Szproch in Coblens

War dir schon immer klar, dass du eine Künstlerin bist?

Ja, das war es mir. Ich kann sagen, dass ich so geboren worden bin. Ich bin auch in einer künstlerischen Umgebung aufgewachsen. Meine Eltern sind beide klassische Musiker und ich habe durch meinen Vater schon sehr früh Kontakt zu den klassischen Künsten gehabt. Aber ich war immer ein neugieriges Kind, habe mich immer anders gefühlt. Weil ich Dinge anders sehe und fühle, hatte ich das Gefühl, nirgendwo richtig dazu zu gehören. Diese Dissonanz zwischen dem Klassischen und dem Unkonventionellen hat meine Interessen geprägt. Ich gehöre weder zu traditionellen noch zu queeren Positionen, ich bin irgendwo dazwischen und bereit, diese Lücke auszuhalten. Mit einer traditionellen fotografischen Bildsprache versuche ich, mein Normen ablehnendes Umfeld zu zeigen, eines, das meiner Meinung nach immer noch unterrepräsentiert ist.

Empfindest du die Kunstwelt eher als rücksichtslos und umkämpft oder als gemeinschaftlich und voller Unterstützung? Oder gibt es für dich Abstufungen zwischen diesen beiden Extremen?

In der Kunstwelt gibt es so viel Spekulation und nur die wenigen ganz oben an der Spitze profitieren wirklich davon. Kunst hat angeblich hehre Ziele, aber gleichzeitig ist sie eine Spielwiese der Heuchlerei. Sie ist für privilegierte, elitäre Leute, die vorgeben, die Welt verbessern zu wollen, aber die meisten scheren sich doch nur um den Ruhm und Profit.
Um ehrlich zu sein, fällt es mir schwer, die Kunstwelt zu beobachten und mich damit zu identifizieren. Auf der einen Seite ist mein Dasein als Künstlerin eine unausweichliche Leidenschaft, die weit über Ehrgeiz oder ein Hobby hinausreicht. Aber ich bin mit der Realität der Kunstwelt sehr unzufrieden und unsicher, ob ich darauf abziele, mich ganz auf sie einzulassen. Ich würde lieber eine Nische von Gleichgesinnten finden, um gemeinsam eine wirklich symbiotische Beziehung aufzubauen.
Ab einem gewissen Alter hat man diesen naiven Enthusiasmus nicht mehr, um nur für die Publicity zu arbeiten und es ist so frustrierend, dass der Wettbewerb und die fehlende Loyalität zwischen KünstlerInnen dazu führt, dass andere, die besser situiert sind, es immer umsonst machen werden. Für die, die weniger privilegiert sind, wird es nie ein faires Rennen sein. Die Frage ist nur, ob es ein Rennen sein muss. Deshalb sollten wir das Problem klar benennen und versuchen, demokratischere Lösungen zu finden, die sich auf kleinere, alternative Künstler-Gemeinschaften verteilen.

4SEE Artist Profile 12 Joanna Szproch "Smile for me Daddy"
4SEE Artist Profile 12 Joanna Szproch „Smile for me Daddy“

Was ist deiner Meinung nach dein bisher größter Erfolg?

„Dies über alles: Sei dir selber treu” – Meine größte Errungenschaft ist, dass ich mich selbst nie betrogen habe, indem ich authentisch und ehrlich geblieben bin, sowohl persönlich als auch künstlerisch. In persönlichen Beziehungen kann ich Kompromisse eingehen, in meiner Kunst muss ich jedoch radikal sein.
Ich habe erkannt, dass Ehrgeiz ein boshafter Trieb ist, der nie befriedigt werden kann und nach jedem Erfolg nur Leere hinterlässt. Die schwerste Arbeit ist, nicht vor dem Unbekannten zurückzuschrecken und dem Lauf der Dinge zu folgen. Ich genieße lieber den Prozess und das Vorankommen, nicht die Perfektion, und bin mir bewusst, dass Ziele die Gegenwart töten können.
Aber natürlich ist es auch gut, etwas abzuschließen, um etwas Neues anzufangen, neu zu kalibrieren.
Mein größter Erfolg bisher wird es sein, mein erstes Fotobuch als Abschluss meines bisher längsten fortlaufenden Projekts @smileformedaddy, das vor Kurzem in Form von Einzel- und Gruppenausstellungen zu sehen war, zu veröffentlichen.
Ich habe das Projekt 2010 angefangen. Es ist eine sehr stimulierende Geschichte sowohl auf visueller als auch semantischer Ebene über die Suche nach der eigenen weiblichen Identität innerhalb einer klassischen, symbiotischen Beziehung zwischen einer Auteur und ihrer Muse. Es ist die visuelle Chronik der inneren Transformation beider Frauen. In unserer Hingabe zu diesen synchronen Fantasien konnten wir unsere authentische und ungezügelte Macht annehmen, um etwas Faszinierendes, Unschuldiges und doch Erotisches zu entdecken.

4SEE Artist Profile 12 Joanna Szproch "lenskaaaaaa"
4SEE Artist Profile 12 Joanna Szproch „lenskaaaaaa“

Muss Kunst immer bedeutungsvoll sein? Gibt es Raum für ästhetische Spielereien oder denkst du das Politische immer mit? Wenn nicht Politik, was inspiriert dich dann?

Die Bedeutung von Kunst ist sehr unklar, transzendent und subjektiv. Was ich an Kunst liebe, sind ihre mehrschichtigen Metaphern, die mehrere Interpretationen zulassen. Am meisten interessiert mich dieser fast mystische Moment von Überlagerung zwischen dem Werkträger und der Rezipientin, die davon eingenommen ist und sich ganz der kathartischen Betrachtung hingibt. Das kann auf vielen Ebenen geschehen, ästhetisch und spirituell. Kunst kann etwas die Sprache Überschreitendes auslösen, bei dem Oberfläche und die Bedeutung gleichzeitig wichtig sind.
Meine wichtigste Inspiration ist meine eigene Wahrnehmung und was ich ihretwegen erlebe, denn das sind die authentischsten und zuverlässigsten Quellen für mich. Aber heutzutage wird alles politisch, auch Identität, deshalb fällt es schwer, das außen vor zu lassen. Obwohl ich versuche, von ideologischen Statements fern zu bleiben, glaube ich daran, dass keine Veränderung ohne Repräsentation geschehen kann. Ich möchte durch meine Kunst Menschen dazu bewegen, sich selbst bewusster und offener zu werden, statt an einer bestimmten Überzeugung zu haften.

Welche Themen inspirieren dich zur Zeit?

Ich bin eine sehr neugierige Person, deshalb gibt es immer eine Flut an Interessen, die mich inspirieren. Es ist sehr schwer, zu definieren, wie genau das, was ich gerade untersuche, zu dem Endergebnis werden wird, oder wie es mich dort hinbringen wird, denn der beste Gutachter ist die Zeit. Ich brauche erst ein wenig Abstand, um es in eine Form zu bringen.
Mich haben schon immer die Beziehungen zwischen mir und anderen Menschen interessiert, also habe ich neben @smilefomedaddy, das in meinen Augen quasi abgeschlossen ist, die Idee entwickelt, dass ich nicht einfach ein Voyeur in meiner Muse-Auteur-Konstellation sein kann und Teilnehmerin sein muss. Jetzt bin ich selbstbewusster, verletzlich zu sein und mich selbst in meine Werke einzubringen, um eine Beziehung auf einer umfassenderen Ebene einzugehen.
Also habe ich mich in letzter Zeit selbst in meinen Beziehungen beobachtet; zu dem Menschen, den ich liebe, meiner Teenager-Tochter, und meine sentimentale Bindung zur Landschaft und angesammelten Objekten, mit dem Ziel, die Bedeutung des Gewöhnlichen zu zeigen.

4SEE Artist Profile 12 Joanna Szproch "me and my bf 2nd alternative"
4SEE Artist Profile 12 Joanna Szproch „me and my bf 2nd alternative“

Wie ist es, in Berlin zu arbeiten und zu leben?

Berlin ist ein sehr spezieller Ort. Er hat eine sehr interessante Geschichte mit einer langen, dekadenten Boheme-Tradition, der Zeit der Mauer und des Mauerfalls, viele alternativen Bewegungenn und einer Sozialpolitik, die Multikulturalismus fördert. Und diese rebellische Athmosphäre machte es zum perfekten Boden für KünstlerInnen aus aller Welt. Aber das ist auch utopisch, weit entfernt von der Realität gewöhnlicher Leute. Ich sehe auch eine Trennung zwischen unangepassten Auswanderern und den lokalen, deutschen Anwohnern. Ich spüre, dass noch viel passieren muss, um diese gläserne Decke zu durchbrechen. Beide Seiten müssen sich Mühe geben.
Trotzdem hat diese Freiheit in Berlin, sich selbst auszudrücken, mich dazu angeregt, privat und publik selbstbewusster zu sein und damit auch mein Werk stark beeinflusst.

Woran arbeitest du und wo kann man deine Arbeiten das nächste Mal sehen?

Die nächste Sache, die ich plane, ist eine Kollaboration mit der Kuratorin Agata Ciastoń und dem Choreographen Mateusz Czyczerski aus Breslau (Polen), basierend auf unseren gemeinsamen Interessen und künstlerischen Praktiken. Wir möchten Workshops mit der Präsentation unserer Werke verbinden. Die Idee ist, mittels Kunst über Körperlichkeit und Selbstdarstellung, über sozial erzwungene Normen (männlich, weiblich), über Scham als Verteidung (Angst vor Bewertungen, Abweichung von Normen) zu reflektieren. Das Ziel ist, die Suche nach neuen Ausdrucksmöglichkeiten zu inspirieren; Schemata abzulehnen, Mut zu befördern. Im Herbst wird das Projekt in beiden Städten zu sehen sein, Berlin und Breslau.
Um mein Buch Wirklichkeit werden zu lassen, plane ich eine Crowdfunding-Kampagne, also bleibt aufmerksam und folgt meinem Instagram-Account @johana_pl. Jedes bisschen Unterstützung wird von mir wirklich hoch geschätzt!

4SEE Artist Profile 12 Joanna Szproch "Smile for me Daddy"
4SEE Artist Profile 12 Joanna Szproch „Smile for me Daddy“

Wo siehst du dich und deine Kunst in zehn Jahren?

Ich weiß, dass es hilft, etwas zu visualisieren, um es zu erreichen, aber ich befürchte, dass zuviel Blick in die Zukunft mich weniger präsent sein lässt. Ich bin gerade 40 geworden, was für Frauen eine wichtige Zahl ist. Ich erwarte große Veränderungen in den nächsten Jahren. Rückblickend hätte ich vor zehn Jahren nie gedacht, dass ich heute in Berlin sein würde und wie es mein Leben und das Leben meiner Tochter verändern würde. Deshalb möchte ich einfach offen für Neues bleiben.
Obwohl ich immer noch eine Großstadtpflanze bin, werde ich in zehn Jahren hoffentlich ganzheitlicher und stärker mit der Natur verbunden sein, denn wir sind alle Teil von ihr und resonieren mit ihr. Abgesehen vom Globalismus wünsche ich mir, dass wir als Gesellschaft mehr zu unseren Wurzeln zurückkehren, Lokalität kultivieren und unsere kleinen Gemeinschaften stützen.
Ich möchte in Zukunft auch mobiler werden. Meine Tochter wird bald erwachsen sein, also werde ich unabhängiger sein. Auf professioneller Ebene würde ich wirklich gerne mehr Kollaborationen mit lokalen KünstlerInnen-Gemeinschaften in ganz Europa und längerfristig vielleicht auf anderen Kontinenten entwickeln.

4SEE Artist Profile 12 Joanna Szproch "me and my bf"
4SEE Artist Profile 12 Joanna Szproch „me and my bf“

Die neuen Vorreiter – Artist Profile 11

Guillaume Kashima

Interview JUSTIN ROSS
Fotografin CHARLOTTE KRAUSS

Guillaume Kashima ist ein französischer Illustrator, Designer und, auch wenn er sich selbst davor scheut, es zu sagen, definitiv ein Künstler. Eine Vielzahl von Einflüssen aus Hip-Hop, Street Art und Popkultur prägt seine gewitzte Herangehensweise an Pop Art für das digitale Zeitalter. Ich arbeitete mit Guillaume für eine Ausstellung im SomoS Art House in Berlin zusammen, als er dort 2016 im Rahmen des Pictoplasma Festivals für Illustratoren ausstellte, und hatte das Glück, damals einen seiner Drucke zu ergattern. Sein spezieller Standpunkt und sein einzigartiger Illustrationsstil haben in letzter Zeit viel Aufmerksamkeit erregt, was zu Aufträgen von großen Kunden wie Vodafone und Google geführt hat. Der beste Ort, um seine Arbeit zu sehen, ist der Ace & Tate-Laden in der Fasanenstraße in Berlin, wo man eines seiner exzentrischen, fast aliengleichen Wesen hinter einer Wand hervorlugen sieht. Oder man besucht seine Website, um eine ganze Reihe an Drucken, Animationen, Objekten und anderen Projekten zu betrachten.

Guillaume Kashima interview
Korrekturbrillen von YUN

Name Guillaume Kashima
Alter 40
Nationalität französisch
Techniken Zeichnung, Illustration, Keramik
lebt und arbeitet in Berlin
neues Werk Wandgemälde für eine Ace & Tate-Filiale
mehr unter guillaumekashima.com

Alright
Alright

War dir schon immer klar, dass du ein Künstler (oder Illustrator) bist?

Nein. Als ich jung war, wusste ich nicht, was es bedeutet, ein Künstler zu sein. Ich wurde von einer alleinerziehenden Mutter aufgezogen, deshalb war keine Zeit für Galerie- und Museumsbesuche übrig. Sie hat aber immer meine Kreativität gefördert. Ich habe schon viel gezeichnet und genäht. Ich würde sagen, ich hatte ein Bewusstsein für Schönheit. Mir war auch klar, dass jemand für diese Schönheit verantwortlich war. Das wurde mir mit etwa 12 Jahren klar, als Jean Paul Gaultier im Fernsehen zu seiner Kollektion interviewt wurde. Ich verstand die Verbindung zwischen einer Person und ihrer Arbeit. Ich war schüchtern und etwas unbeholfen als Kind, aber die Leute mochten meine Zeichnungen und dadurch konnte ich Fragmente meiner Persönlichkeit mit ihnen teilen. So konnte ich andere Menschen erreichen und wahrscheinlich war das einer der Gründe, die mich zum Grafikdesign gebracht haben.

Empfindest du die Kunstwelt eher als rücksichtslos und umkämpft oder als gemeinschaftlich und voller Unterstützung? Oder gibt es für dich Abstufungen zwischen diesen beiden Extremen?

Früher habe ich mich unter meinen Kollegen schlecht gefühlt, weil ich meine eigenen Unsicherheiten und meine Frustration projiziert habe. Ich fühlte mich verurteilt und bedeutungslos… bis vor gar nicht so langer Zeit, als ich meine Stimme gefunden habe. Das war absoluter Zufall. Aus dem Nichts. Aus dieser Perspektive betrachtet, habe ich verstanden, dass die meisten Menschen mit sich selbst beschäftigt sind. Es gibt keinen Wettkampf. Ich kann immer noch neidisch sein, wenn ich gerade keine Aufträge habe und jemand einen großen bekommt, aber bei dieser Angst geht es um mich, nicht um die anderen.

Guillaume Kashima
Guillaume Kashima

Was ist deiner Meinung nach dein bisher größter Erfolg?

Emojis und animierte Sticker, die ich für verschiedene Plattformen gemacht habe. Ich liebe die Vorstellung, dass Menschen meine Werke benutzen, um zu kommunizieren und Witze zu machen. Das ist großartig.

Muss Kunst immer bedeutungsvoll sein? Gibt es Raum für ästhetische Spielereien oder denkst du das Politische immer mit?

Früher habe ich mich zur Kunst gewendet, um aus unserer Welt schlau zu werden. Als Teenager, um zu verstehen, was schwul sein bedeutet. Vor gar nicht so langer Zeit, circa 2016, verfolgte ich in den Nachrichten die Proteste gegen homosexuelle Ehen in Frankreich, Black Lives Matter und später die Trump-Wahl, und wurde richtig paranoid. Um mich herum gab es immer eine beruhigende Stimme, aber sie kam nie aus „der Kunstwelt”. Dieses Jahr war die 9. Berlin Biennale und ich sagte einfach „Tschüß”. Ich mochte zeitgenössische Kunst noch nie so richtig, aber das Zynismus-Level war zu hoch. Wenn ich darüber nachdenke, scheint mir zeitgenössische Kunst sowieso nicht ein Schauplatz für politische Kommentare zu sein. Man muss schnell antworten und nur Musik oder Stand Up-Comedy können das. Beyoncé veröffentlichte „Formation” im Dezember 2016. Kendrick veröffentlichte „Damn” im April 2017. Und in dieser Zeit habe ich keine einzige Ausstellung gesehen, die Kommentare in dieser Art gemacht hat.

Ich persönliche bringe Politik in meine kommerziellen Arbeiten. Wenn ich für andere Bilder kreiere, bin ich besonders sorgsam, was Repräsentation angeht. Ich versuche, Raum für jeden zu schaffen … das klingt blöd, aber die meisten Bilder um uns herum zeigen weiße cissexuelle Menschen. Wir brauchen andere Stimmen und Gesichter. Ich glaube nicht, dass das Absicht ist. Die meisten Menschen, die die Entscheidungen bei der Entstehung dieser Bilder treffen, sehen so aus, und wenn man diesen Diskurs nicht an sie heranträgt, denken sie nicht daran.

Vermutlich wirke ich jetzt wie ein Moralapostel, aber wofür hat man denn sonst so eine Plattform?

Wie ist es, in Berlin zu arbeiten und zu leben?

Berlin ist die perfekte Homebase. Man kann noch mit wenig Geld gut auskommen. Wenn man ein neues Handwerk oder eine neue Technik lernen will, gibt es immer jemanden, den man fragen kann. Der Nachteil ist, dass ich hier überhaupt keine Inspiration finde. Die Stadt scheint festzustecken. Man spürt gar nicht, dass wir uns auf 2020 zubewegen. Es gibt kaum Vielfalt. Diese „Es gibt nur eine richtige Variante”-Stimmung ist manchmal erdrückend … aber es gibt auch interessante alternative Wege. Und ich kann nicht fassen, dass es nichtmal ein gutes Museum gibt, wie das Tate oder Pompidou. Ich meine … was zur Hölle?

Woran arbeitest du und wo kann man deine Arbeiten das nächste Mal sehen?

Im Moment lerne ich von meinen Studiokollegen, Keramik herzustellen. Es ist spannend, etwas Neues zu lernen. Wir haben viel Spaß. Wir haben eine Seite namens „Cassius Clay Clay”, auf der wir unsere Experimente und komischen Kram verkaufen. Schaut es euch an, kauft etwas.

Guillaume Kashima interview
Sonnenbrille von RTco

Wo siehst du dich und deine Kunst in zehn Jahren?

Das ist eine furchterregende Frage, denn wie Heidi sagt: „Eines Tages bist du noch dabei, am nächsten Tag bist du raus”. In Verbindung mit der Tatsache, dass ich kaum Ehrgeiz habe, kann das nur zu einem Desaster führen … aber wenn ich mir etwas für mich selbst wünschen könnte, dann, dass ich einfach glücklich damit bin, meine Technik zu perfektionieren, und davon leben kann. Ehrlich gesagt hatte ich immer viel Glück, Arbeit zu finden und Menschen zu treffen, die sie wertschätzen. Mehr als das brauche ich nicht.


Jezt wo ich darüber nachdenke, falls ein Mann daher kommt: Der Beifahrersitz ist noch frei.

Bianca Felix artists filmmaker Berlin Bert Spangemacher

Original Thinking

Interview JUSTIN ROSS
Fotograf BERT SPANGEMACHER

In unserem Informationszeitalter ist Inspiration nur einen Fingerwisch entfernt. Aber woher kommt echte Originalität? Wir haben einige der progressivsten, kreativsten und authentischsten Innovatoren in Kunst, Design, Mode und Kultur nach ihrer Perspektive auf die wichtigsten Aspekte von Originalität befragt. Unkonventinell, grundsätzlich, aufregend oder exzentrisch, diese Menschen kennen ihre Wurzeln und gehen ihren eigenen Weg in einer Welt voll Wettbewerb.

BIANCA KENNEDY & FELIX KRAUS, KünstlerInnen und Filmemacher aus Berlin
Ideen Zukunft Film | Große Ideen in kurzen Filmen

„Ich lasse Gefühle (statt Ideen) für neue Projekte auf mich zukommen und versuche, ihnen Leben durch Virtual und Augmented Reality, Schreiben und analoge Methoden zu verleihen.”

Bianca Felix artists filmmaker Berlin Bert Spangemacher
swancollective.com
biancakennedy.com

Worum geht es in eurem neuen Film The Lives Beneath?
Es ist der dritte Film in unserem futuristischen Werkzyklus „LIFE 3.0 – cycle”. The Lives Beneath zeigt eine Welt im Jahre 4000. Alles in der Natur wird zu einem einzigen Bewusstsein vereint. Pflanzen, Tiere und Menschen formen ein weltweites Super-Netzwerk aus Bewusstsein. Wir untersuchen den Untergang einer Gesellschaft, die sich weigerte, in Harmonie mit der Natur zu leben. Aber dem gegenüber steht ein sich selbst bewusster Planet, der unter der Bürde leidet, für alle Ewigkeit denken zu müssen.

Wo findet ihr Inspiration?
Bianca: Ich liebe es zwar, in Büchern für meine Projekte zu recherchieren, aber ich glaube nicht, dass Inspiration einfach so in einen fährt. Die meiste Zeit ist Kunst machen ein echter Beruf und es ist wichtig, dass man weiter arbeitet – auch und vor allem wenn es schwer ist oder sich wie Zeitverschwendung anfühlt. Meistens kommen neue Ideen, die das Werk bereichern, wenn man weiter macht.

Felix: Ich interessiere mich tiefgehend für Quantenmechanik und ihre Auswirkungen auf das, was wir als Realität wahrnehmen. Als überzeugter Panpsychist (die These, dass alles ein Bewusstsein hat), glaube ich, dass alles, was existiert, reines Denken ist. Erst die Bewusstseinsebene verschlüsselt unsere Gedanken zu dem, was wir für Materie, Zeit und Raum halten. Ich lese viel über dieses Thema. Kombiniert mit luzidem Träumen lasse ich lieber Gefühle (statt Ideen) für neue Projekte auf mich zukommen und versuche, ihnen Leben durch Virtual und Augmented Reality, Schreiben und analoge Methoden zu verleihen.

Felix artists filmmaker Berlin Bert Spangemacher
swancollective.com
biancakennedy.com

Denkst du bei Originalität eher an Grundsätze oder an Innovation?
Bianca: Mir ist aufgefallen, dass meine Werke immer irgendwie herausstechen, wenn man sie mit anderen vergleicht. Ein wenig mehr Farbe, sie sind verspielter, oder haben mehr Details. Vielleicht kann ich, weil ich mich nicht selbst durch eine bestimmte Haltung oder einen Stil einschränke, meine Ideen unbefangener umsetzen. Ich akzeptiere ungewöhnliche oder kindliche Gedanken und kombiniere sie mit schwarzem Humor oder verstörenden Bildern.

Felix: Das Streben nach Originalität hat mich schon früh angetrieben. Natürlich ist es irgendwie anmaßend, seine eigene Arbeit als originell zu betiteln. Aber ich habe in meiner künstlerischen Praxis immer zumindest versucht, etwas zu finden, das noch nie jemand gemacht hat. Virtual und Augmented Reality sind deshalb der perfekte Spielplatz für mich, denn sie sind ein neues Medium, in dem es noch viele unbeschrittene Pfade gibt.

Was ratet ihr Menschen, die aus der Masse herausstechen wollen?
Bianca: Hör auf, cool sein zu wollen. Coolness ist langweilig und eine schützende Mauer, die nichts zu einem nachdenklichen Gespräch, Ereignis oder einer Beziehung beiträgt. Auf lange Sicht ist es soviel interessanter, sich nicht zu verbiegen und ein wenig Spaß zu haben. Wen kümmert es, was die Leute denken?
Felix: Ich wünschte, KünstlerInnen würden etwas bescheidener werden. Es ist ein Beruf, der wichtig für die Gesellschaft ist, aber einige erwarten zu viel Liebe und Akzeptanz von allen anderen. Jeder bemüht sich, seinen eigenen Weg durchs Leben zu finden, und niemand ist besser als jemand anderes. Heutzutage sticht man nicht dadurch heraus, dass man am lautesten schreit, sondern still zuhört.

Was sind eure liebsten Brillen und warum?
Felix: Obwohl ich der größte Anhänger von Virtual Reality und ihrem Zukunftspotential bin, sind die echten Gamechanger AR-Brillen wie Hololens oder Magic Leap. Sie befinden sich zwar noch in Kinderschuhen, aber die Visionen sind echt. Die Anreicherung unserer Umgebung wird eines Tages so normal sein wie Fernsehen oder Internet. Ich versuche, ganz vorne mit dabei zu sein und auf eine positive Zukunft mit all ihren Möglichkeiten hinzusteuern.

Bianca Felix artists filmmaker Berlin Bert Spangemacher
swancollective.com
biancakennedy.com

Mehr unter: www.biancakennedy.com / www.swancollective.com

Sponsor
Yuichi Toyama ad for 4SEE #11 Wild Issue
Sponsor